Thursday, October 31, 2013

AFF Japan: Sesame Dressing

 
We love this Goma (sesame seed in Japanese language) Dressing. 
Usually we would just grab a bottle from the store since I was not aware that it is doable at home. 
With this recipe shared by Just One Cookbook, there won't be a need to pick this up from the shop anymore.  It is also great $ savings because one bottle costs about RM9 thereabout, unless there's an offer, then it would be RM1 cheaper. 
With the money, I would be able to get plentiful of homemade Sesame Dressing that would last me like a month of so if I were to eat this everyday. 
The store-bought bottle would only like be able to last us less than a week, and that's not daily consumption also. 
 
I am submitting this to AFF#1 - Japan
 

SESAME DRESSING
Ingredients:
3 tbsp white sesame seeds
2 tbsp Japanese mayonnaise *I used homemade mayonnaise*
2 tbsp rice vinegar *I used River Bridge brand*
1 1/2 tbsp light soya sauce *I used LKK brand*
1 tsp sugar *I used soft brown sugar*
1/2 tsp mirin
1/2 tsp sesame oil *I used black sesame oil*
a pinch of salt

Method:
1/  Fry sesame seeds in a frying pan over low heat stirring it all the time to prevent it from burning until sesame seeds starts to get plump and jump. 
2/  Remove sesame seeds from heat immediately and let it cool for a bit. 
3/  Place the sesame seeds into a plastic bag and pound to grind it into fine powder. 
4/  Combine everything in a bowl and whisk until homogeneous. 
5/  Serve with salad and store the rest in the fridge. 

p/s:  We found this a little too sourish for us, so I added one more teaspoon of sugar, thus in total I used 2 teaspoon of sugar. 

 

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

AFF Japan: Japanese Cabbage Salad with Chuka-Fu Dressing

 
I made this to participate in the Asian Food Fest #1, and this month,
October 2013, it is J-A-P-A-N,
 
This is a very nice salad that WendyinKK shared, and as I had almost all the ingredients ready at home, I can whip it up in no time. 
The dressing made the otherwise bland fresh cabbage very appetising. 
The sweet sourish salty taste went extremely well with the crunchy vegetable,
what's more, it's light on the palate! 
 


JAPANESE CABBAGE SALAD WITH CHUKA-FU DRESSING
Ingredients: 
1 heaped cup of finely sliced cabbage
8 slices of Japanese cucumber *I used more of these in lieu of tomatoes*
4 slices of tomatoes *I omitted this because I ran out of it in my fridge*
a few lemon wedges *I omitted this because there was none in my fridge*
Some toasted sesame seeds

3 tsp rice vinegar *I used River Bridge brand*
2 tsp light soya sauce *I used LKK brand*
2 tsp sugar *I used soft brown sugar*
1 tsp sesame oil *I used black sesame oil*

Method: 
1/  Mix the dressing ingredients together and taste that it is well balanced (else, adjust to your own preference). 
2/  Divide the finely sliced cabbage into 2 portions and drizzle the dressing over. 
3/  Sprinkle with sesame seeds as garnish, then toss before eating. 

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

Onion Rings In Breadcrumbs

With the balance of the milk from soaking the Crispy Onion Rings, I went to make another batch because I just can't bring myself to throw away the milk.  I wanted to try and see if it was ok to reuse the milk, and was glad that the outcome of the onion rings were not affected.  I also tried to breadcrumb the onion rings to check the effect, and was happy with the results because these Breadcrumbed Onion Rings stayed crispy longer.   
 
 
 
ONION RINGS IN BREADCRUMBS
Source: Revised version of this  
Yield: Serves 2 adults
Ingredients: 
2 big yellow onions (cut into 1" thick and separated into individual rings)
1 liter milk *I used Dutch Lady's UHT Low Fat Milk*
 
100g plain flour
1/4 tsp fine salt
1/2 tsp ground black pepper
 
120g breadcrumbs
 
oil for frying
 
Method: 
1/  Soak onion rings in milk overnight (do ensure all onion rings are submerged in milk). 
2/  The next day, put flour in a big bowl, then add in salt and pepper to mix evenly. 
3/  Remove raw onion rings from milk, toss them in flour and set aside. 
4/  Once all raw onion rings are coated with flour, dip it piece by piece into milk and coat with breadcrumbs. 
5/  Heat up oil in a shallow pan till 1", then drop onion rings into pan to deep-fry till golden. 
6/  Remove onion ring once it turned golden and drain on a metal colander to collect the excess oil before laying them on absorbent paper to further absorb excess oil. 
7/  Serve immediately. 
 

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Herbed Homemade Chicken Ham

 
Made one more batch of Chicken Ham, and 2 flavours also.  The one with mixed herbs was excellent, aroma was sufficiently strong, while the black pepper was too mild.  Probably due to the grade of black pepper used, as the one I utilised was sponsored by McD.  Hahha...was trying to finish up the stash collected from the few McDeliveries and takeouts, all in all, I opened 10 sachets. 
 
I also left the chicken skin intact because I saw that MK left it on in her photos, but I think I would revert to my first attempt of using skinless chicken so as to let the herbs penetrate the chicken better. 
 
p
 
HERBED HOMEMADE CHICKEN HAM
Source:  Adapted from Lydia
Yield:  1 loaf
Ingredients:
Mixed Herb Homemade Chicken Ham
1/2 whole chicken breast meat (300g+)
1 tsp mixed herbs
1 tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp fine salt

Black Pepper Homemade Chicken Ham
1/2 whole chicken breast meat (300g+)
1/2 tsp ground black pepper
1 tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp fine salt
 
Method:
1/  Cut open (butterfly) each half to make it thinner. 
2/  Mix seasonings in a bowl, then rub meat with seasonings evenly and roll it up by wrapping each roll with plastic wrap.  Keep in the refrigerator for 1 to 2 nights
3/  Wrap it with another layer of plastic wrap and tie the ends tightly.
4/  Place rolls in a pot, fill in enough water and bring to a boil.  Then, turn the heat down and let it simmer for 15 - 20 minutes. 
5/  Turn the heat off, with the lid on, let chicken roll cool completely in the pot together with the water. 
6/  Remove from pot, pat dry with kitchen towel then keep in the refrigerator overnight, OR at least 3 hours before serving. 
7/  Unwrap, slice and ready to eat.
 

Monday, October 21, 2013

Golden Pumpkin Scones

I didn't do a good job for this, I misread the recipe and forgot to let the pumpkin puree cool down before using! 
Ended up with a chewy kuih-like texture, hahah... so would need to revisit this recipe to nail it right. 
But the lovely hue is so so inviting... 
 
 
 
GOLDEN PUMPKIN SCONES
Source:  Jane's Corner
Yield:  5 pieces (the recipe below is 3/5 portion of the original's because as only had that much of pumpkin)
Ingredients:
150g pumpkin (cubed and steamed till tender and mashed)
180g self raising flour (sifted) *I used 180g plain flour + 3/4 tsp baking powder*
45g icing sugar
a pinch of ground nutmeg *I omitted because none at home*
1 tbsp coconut milk
Dough weight = 380g
 
1 tbsp milk (for brushing scones top)
 
Method: 
1/  Preheat oven to 200C. 
2/  Sift flour, icing sugar and nutmeg in a large mixing bowl. 
3/  Form a well in the centre then add cream and pumpkin puree. 
4/  Using cutting method, cut wet ingredients into dry ingredients to form a soft dough.  Mixture should hold together but not sticky, but if too dry, more cream can be added. 
5/  Gently gather dough together onto a floured surface, then roll out to 2-3cm thickness and using a 5.5 cm cutter (dipped in flour), cut rounds of dough and transfer to a lightly greased oven tray. 
6/  Brush pumpkin scones with milk and bake until it turns golden and sounds hollow when tapped. 
7/  Serve warm. 
 

Saturday, October 19, 2013

Home-made Chicken Ham

Home-made Chicken Ham...was caught unaware that it is doable at home! 
Of course it would not be exactly the same as those commercially sold, but I was game to try. 
Most of the time was spent on marinating, about 2 days in the fridge, then came the part of cooking it and let it soak in the water to cool down.  Finally, let the Chicken Ham rest for at least 3 hours before unravelling it and enjoy! 
 
I modified the recipe according to the availability of ingredients in my kitchen, and the recipe was adapted from MyKitch3n.  I also did 2 versions, one with sugar while the other with honey to try the difference.  Both equally good, there was a hint of honey for the honey version.  Sweetness and saltiness just perfect as well.  Next would be adding herbs and spices! 
 
 
2 versions, with "H" indicating Honey.   
 
It was quite cute in size, just look at the statistics! 
 
HOME-MADE CHICKEN HAM
Source:  Lydia
Yield:  1 loaf
Ingredients:
1/2 whole chicken breast meat (300g+) *I used 250g because the chicken I bought was small*
1 tbsp sake *I omitted because none at home*
1 tsp sugar *I used 1 tbsp instead in lieu of sake*
1/2 tsp fine salt
1/2 tsp garlic powder *I omitted because none at home*
1/4 tsp pepper
 
HONEY Chicken Ham
1/2 whole chicken breast meat (300g+) *I used 250g because the chicken I bought was small*
1 tbsp sake *I omitted because none at home*
1 tsp honey *I used 1 tbsp instead in lieu of sake*
1/2 tsp fine salt
1/2 tsp garlic powder *I omitted because none at home*
1/4 tsp pepper
 
Method:
1/  Cut open (butterfly) each half to make it thinner. 
2/  Mix seasonings in a bowl, then rub meat with seasonings evenly and roll it up by wrapping each roll with plastic wrap.  Keep in the refrigerator for 1 to 2 nights
3/  Wrap it with another layer of plastic wrap and tie the ends tightly.
4/  Place rolls in a pot, fill in enough water and bring to a boil.  Then, turn the heat down and let it simmer for 15 - 20 minutes. 
5/  Turn the heat off, with the lid on, let chicken roll cool completely in the pot together with the water. 
6/  Remove from pot, pat dry with kitchen towel then keep in the refrigerator overnight, OR at least 3 hours before serving. 
7/  Unwrap, slice and ready to eat.
 

Friday, October 18, 2013

Crispy Onion Rings

Crispy Onion Rings...this is good, thanks to the insightful tips from Luan of EVC! 
As the amount of milk and water was not indication, I just went ahead to soak the onion rings in milk.  Turned out ok for me. 
 
 
 
Need to eat these Onion Rings immediately, else they turned soggy, so do time your schedule accordingly. 
Minimum ingredients, maximum results, that's the best! 
 
 
CRISPY ONION RINGS
Source: Luan of EVC
Yield: Serves 2 adults
Ingredients: 
2 big yellow onions (cut into 1" thick and separated into individual rings)
1 liter milk *I used Dutch Lady's UHT Low Fat Milk*
1st coating
150g plain flour
1/8 tsp fine salt
1/2 tsp ground black pepper
2nd coating
150g plain flour
1/8 tsp fine salt
 
oil for frying
 
Method: 
1/  Soak onion rings in milk overnight (do ensure all onion rings are submerged in milk). 
2/  The next day, put flour in a big bowl, then add in salt and pepper to mix evenly. 
3/  Remove raw onion rings from milk, toss them in flour and set aside. 
4/  Once all raw onion rings are coated with flour, dip it piece by piece into milk and coat with flour again, so total coating is twice. 
5/  Heat up oil in a shallow pan till 1", then drop onion rings into pan to deep-fry till golden. 
6/  Remove onion ring once it turned golden and drain on a metal colander to collect the excess oil before laying them on absorbent paper to further absorb excess oil. 
7/  Serve immediately. 
 
Note:
a/  I separated the flour coating ingredients part to 2 so as not to make the flour clumpy with the wetness from milk. 

 
 
Top:  First coating,
Below:  Second coating (ready for the fryer)
 
 
 
 
 

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Bak Assam Take 2

 
A remake of the Bak Assam, but this time, I used the Assam Jawa Extra which came in seedless paste form.  The result of using this Assam Jawa Extra was disappointing as the gravy just refused to thicken.  Guess the good old tamarind pulp with seeds is the way to go, no lazy way out. 
 


BAK ASSAM TAKE 2
Source:  Adapted from "Penang Nyonya A-ma Secret Recipes" by Chef Phillip Yong (page 22)
Yield:  Serves 2 adults
Ingredients:  this is half portion of the original recipe
300g pork belly
50g assam jawa extra (seedless tamarind paste by Adabi brand)
125ml water
3 tbsp sugar
1/4 tsp fine salt

Method: 
1/  Combine tamarind paste with water then add in sugar and salt.  
2/  Marinate the pork with the tamarind juice overnight in the refrigerator. 
3/  Thaw to room temperature the next day, then boil everything over medium fire till gravy is thick, about 20 minutes and check for doneness.  If pork is still not tender, add water and cook till gravy gets thick again. 
4/  Let pork cool before dishing up and cut into thick slices to serve. 

 

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Home-made Sweetened Condensed Milk Take 4

The Home-made Sweetened Condensed Milk fun continues, now I'm making my 4th batch.  This time, I played with the sugar instead.  I used 2 types of sugar to mellow down the colour as utilising soft brown sugar gave me an end product which was too dark.  But still wanting to have the hint of molasses, I combined castor sugar and soft brown sugar achieve a fairer tone.  Colour wise, this was good. 
 
The T***o house brand of fresh milk was going at an even lower price of RM4.69, and guess what, the shelf was empty!!  It was wiped out, completely sold out...I would say for that price, it was really a steal deal as UHT milk was also fetching that price.  Between fresh and UHT, of course I would opt for the former too.  So the next best deal was a 2 liter pack of Farm Fresh about RM12.50, more or less, so that was the milk used in this batch. 
 




HOME-MADE SWEETENED CONDENSED MILK
Source:  Just as Delish
Yield:  1 jar of 400ml
Ingredients: 
1 liter fresh milk
1 cup sugar (230g) *I used combination of 115g castor sugar + 115g soft brown sugar*
1 tbsp butter

Method: 
1/  In a pot, bring milk and sugar to a boil over medium heat. 
2/  Reduce the heat to low and simmer very gently for about two hours until volume is reduced by half.  The mixture should be barely simmering and never bubbling at any time to get a smooth outcome. 
3/  Stir every 15 minutes to keep the milk from forming a "skin" on top. 
4/  Stir in butter at 2 hours mark, and once butter has melted, remove the Home-made Sweetened Condensed Milk from heat and let it cool.  Mixture will thicken further after it has cooled. 
 
To summarise, the list of "experiments" are: 
 
 

Monday, October 14, 2013

Broccoli Almondine

 
This is a good fast dish with lots of fiber and crunch, both from the vegetable and the nut.  Addictive as well, and I would never imagine that with such simple ingredients, this Broccoli Almondine was elevated to such a high level.  I halved the portion of broccoli, but maintained the rest of the ingredients in the below recipe.  Also changed the method slightly in the final step, whereby EVC sprinkled the butter garlic almond mixture atop her broccoli but I gave everything a quick toss in the pan to mess them all up more evenly. 
 

BROCCOLI ALMONDINE
Source:  EVC
Yield:  Serves 2 adults
Ingredients: 
500g fresh broccoli *I scaled down the broccoli from 1kg as that would be too much for us*
60g salted butter
30g almond flakes
TT salt and pepper (TT as in To Taste)
1 pip garlic (minced)
60ml lemon juice *I omitted this, as we don't fancy sourish dish*

Method
1/  Cut broccoli into small florets, rinse then sprinkle with salt and pepper.
2/  Place broccoli in a single layer on a perforated tray and steam until tender about 2-3 mins
3/  Separately, melt butter in a pan, then sauté garlic followed by almond.  Be careful not to burn them as almond flakes brown very fast. 
4/  Pour in broccoli and give it a light toss to coat with the garlic almond mixture. 

Sunday, October 13, 2013

Aloe Vera Jelly

A recipe that I created on the fly simply because the bottle of Aloe Vera Juice was taking up too much precious fridge space.  What a lousy excuse, eh? 
The Aloe Vera Jelly turned out to be quite nice actually, so it was not a bad decision afterall. 
 
 
 
ALOE VERA JELLY
Ingredients: 
250ml Aloe Vera Juice
1/2 tsp agar-agar powder
 
Method: 
1/  Sprinkle agar-agar powder over the aloe vera juice and bring the mixture to a boil. 
2/  Let mixture cool down a bit before pouring into moulds and chill till set. 
 
Verdict:  Quite sourish and tasted with grape flavour because the aloe vera juice came with grape flavour.  Jelly was wobbly, so just nice. 

 
Bought this on promotion at RM6 just because I was curious how it tasted like, hahah...
 
 

Saturday, October 12, 2013

Sauteed Pork Mince With Mushroom

Another remake, but more like an enhancement I would say, since it was with an additional item.  Or would the term value-added sound better? 
And this is the upgraded version of this with dried shitake mushroom thrown in, certainly tasted even better and more umami! 
Introducing
Sauteed Pork Mince with Mushroom For Noodle Soup. 
 
 
 
 
SAUTEED PORK MINCE WITH MUSHROOM FOR NOODLE SOUP
Source:  Table for Two
Ingredients: 
3 tbsp oil
4 shallots (chopped)
4 cloves garlic (chopped)
6 pcs dried shitake mushroom (soaked in water, then cut into cubes and keep the water)
300g minced pork (with some fat)
3 tbsp light soy sauce
1 tbsp dark caramel sauce
1/2 tsp sugar
pepper to taste
 
Method: 
1/  Heat wok and put in oil, then sauté shallots and garlic till almost golden. 
2/  Throw in the mushroom and fry it till aromatic. 
3/  Add in minced to cook till it turns opaque, put in all seasonings plus water from soaking the mushroom and cook until almost dry then dish up. 
 

Friday, October 11, 2013

Cokodok With A Twist

This was an old recipe, just revisited with some ground almond added in for a twist.  This extra ingredient was a nice change and provided little nutty bits for the banana nuggets.  Could add in more ground almond the next time I make this again.  I also scaled the recipe according to the amount of bananas I have in store. 



COKODOK WITH GROUND ALMOND
Source:  A recipe revisited with a twist
Yield:  20 pieces of longan size
Ingredients:
180g slightly overripe bananas (mashed)
1 tbsp sugar
a pinch of salt

65g plain flour (equivalent to 6 tbsp) *I used only 65g instead of 75g in order to take into account the addition of ground almond, lest the kuih gets too dry since ground almond is also a dry ingredient*
1/4 tsp baking powder
1 tbsp ground almond

adequate amount of oil for deep frying

Method:
1/   Put peeled bananas in a plastic bag, then use hands to squeeze them so that they get mashed up, then add in sugar and salt and squeeze the mixture a bit more to get the sugar and salt dissolved. 
2/  Sift plain flour and baking powder together into a big bowl, then add in ground almond and stir to get them evenly mixed. 
3/  Make a well in the centre of the dry ingredients, then add in the banana mixture and mix well to for a soft batter.  *Do NOT overwork the mixture, lest one gets a tough chewy kuih*
4/  Heat up oil in a pot till hot using medium fire, then drop tablespoons of banana batter into it. 
5/  Fry till golden brown, then remove and drain the cokodok on absorbent paper and serve. 

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Bak Assam

E.A.S.Y., that's what this dish is all about. 
Just 3 steps - marinate, cook and serve!  I simplified the method that was given in the book, and served it without sambal belacan.  Good enough for us. 
Bonus...the list of ingredients was very very short, can even count with one hand, and that's 5 ingredients. 
That made this recipe all the more winner in our household. 
 

Close-up look of the Bak Assam...look at the thick gravy.  Very appetising to go with steamed rice with the sweet sourish taste. 


BAK ASSAM
Source:  "Penang Nyonya A-ma Secret Recipes" by Chef Phillip Yong (page 22)
Yield:  Serves 2 adults
Ingredients:  this is half portion of the original recipe
300g pork belly
50g tamarind pulp with seeds
125ml water
1.5 tbsp sugar *I used 3 tbsp sugar instead because it was too sourish for our palate*
1/4 tsp fine salt

Method: 
1/  Combine tamarind pulp with water for 5 minutes, then squeeze out the juice. 
2/  Marinate the pork with the tamarind juice, sugar and  salt overnight in the refrigerator. 
3/  Thaw to room temperature the next day, then boil everything over medium fire till gravy is thick, about 20 minutes and check for doneness.  If pork is still not tender, add water and cook till gravy gets thick again.  *I added 125ml water after the 20 minutes mark and top with 1.5 tbsp of sugar as the dish was too sour for us*
4/  Let pork cool before dishing up and cut into thick slices to serve. 

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Fuss-Free White Baits Omelette

Adapted this idea from Annie's blog, and with the ingredients I have in the fridge, I made it for a quick meal.  The white baits I used was too salty, probably would have to soak it even longer to remove the excess salt since I used the dried version, while that of Annie's was fresh version.  Doubt I have come across fresh white baits here in this sunny island, so just have to adapt.  I just did a quick rinse, so lesson learnt :)
 
Goes very well with porridge as the wet carbo helped to tone down and "dilute" the saltiness. 


FUSS-FREE WHITE BAITS OMELETTE
Source:  Annelicious
Yield:  Serves 2 adults
Ingredients: 
1 tbsp oil
2 tbsp white baits
1 egg

Method: 
1/  Put white baits in a strainer, give it a quick rinse under tap water and then let it drip dry. 
2/  Heat up oil in a pan, add in white baits and toss till fragrant. 
3/  Beat up egg with a fork in the bowl, then pour in the white baits and give this egg mixture a stir. 
4/  Pour the egg mixture into the pan and swirl around to pan fry till set on both sides. 
5/  Dish up and serve. 

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

Homemade Dried Sweet Meat (Bak Kua)

Made a batch of this Dried Sweet Meat because the ones being sold is getting pricey and pricier, it's akin to eating "gold sheets" a RM5 per piece!!  Paying for only 2 pieces is equivalent to the bulk of the cost price for this recipe, and nothing beats homemade.  I managed to get 16 pieces in total, so that worked out to be RM0.80 per piece for raw material cost, what a big difference, right?  Weight of the meat will be reduced after grilling, so below is the statistics for my own reference. 
 
Weight of meat mixture:  1.30kg
Weight of meat after sunning and before grilling:  1.20 kg (16 slices of 13cm x 10cm)
Weight of meat after grilling:  0.96kg (16 slices of 12cm x 9cm)
 
I spread out the meat mixture into 3 trays, with the breakdown as such: 
a/  12" x 12" flat aluminium tray = 500g
b/  12" x 12" grey oven tray = 500g
c/  11" x 8" flat aluminium tray = 300g
*Note to self:  To use flat trays because the grey oven tray has a trough on all sides, which made the bak kua having thicken sides and not of even thickness. 
 
Overall, we like this recipe eventhough I did it without the rose wine. 


AGNES CHANG'S HOMEMADE DRIED SWEET MEAT
Source:  Agnes Chang's "Let's Eat" page
Yield:  16 slices of 12cm x 9cm (just nice size for Massimo Whole Wheat Bread slices)
Ingredients: 
1kg minced pork (80% lean, 20% fat) *I paid RM10 for that, for my own reference*
2 tbsp light soya sauce *I used Lee Kum Kee's*
1 1/2 tbsp fish sauce
1 tbsp oyster sauce
2 tbsp Chinese rose wine *I omitted*
200g sugar
1/2 tsp pepper
1/8 tsp five spice powder
1/2 tsp sesame oil

Method: 
1/  Put minced meat into a mixing bowl followed by all the seasoning and mix well, then leave this aside to season for an hour. 
2/  Press meat into a big rectangular shape about 3/4 cm thick, then dry the trays of meat for about 3-4 hours in the sun until it can be lifted up.  Cut into square pieces of 12cm. 
3/  Grill meat until golden brown on both sides, leave to cool before storing in air-tight container in the fridge. 

Monday, October 7, 2013

Lady's Fingers With Sourish Spicy Bean Paste Sauce

I am submitting this to the LTU event for the month of October hosted by
Mich of Piece of Cake at this post 
with the theme Soya Beans. 
This post is linked to the event, Little Thumbs up organised by Doreen from my little favourite DIY and Zoe of Bake for Happy Kids.  

It is the sauce that is the highlight of this dish.  It goes very well with the steamed lady's fingers and is my kind of diet food. 
Definitely need to get young lady's fingers for this, else it would be too fibrous.  Somehow those lady's fingers sold at supermart can never compare to those bought from the wet market, so I never fail to get some during my weekly marketing. 
 

SOURISH SPICY BEAN PASTE SAUCE
Source:  Tasted at a friend's house
Ingredients:
1 tbsp taucheo (minced)
1 chilli padi (chopped)
4 nos lime (squeezed out the juice)
2 tbsp sugar

Method:
1/  Mix everything together to get a thick syrupy sauce as the sugar melts in the lime juice. 
2/ Pour over steamed lady's fingers and enjoy! 

 
 
 

Sunday, October 6, 2013

Home-made Sweetened Condensed Milk Take 3

 
The experiment with making Home-made Sweetened Condensed Milk continued on with Take 3 now.  With the lesson learnt that butter is essential and not optional in making this, I managed to get a thick consistency in this batch.  And for the record, I used Tesco's home brand of Fresh milk (second from left in this archived photo) at RM4.99 per carton of 1 liter this time.  With the hike in fuel cost, the price of dairy products has been escalating at an alarming rate, and by far, Tesco's house brand is the cheapest in the market for the time being.  Dutch Lady's selling at RM7.00 now and Magnolia's at RM7.15, unless they go on sale when sold in a bundle of 2 for RM13.50 or less.  And let's not talk about Farmhouse's, that was easily hovering at RM8+. 
 

Had this in a mug of Almond Tea, so thick, rich and creamy!  Awesome for the wet rainy monsoon season now, warms the soul. 

Managed to get the right thickness in this batch....YaY! 
 
 
HOME-MADE SWEETENED CONDENSED MILK Source:  Just as Delish
Yield:  1 jar of 400ml
Ingredients: 
1 liter fresh milk
1 cup castor sugar  (230g)
1 tbsp butter *VERY Important ingredient to thicken the condensed milk*

Method: 
1/  In a pot, bring milk and sugar to a boil over medium heat. 
2/  Reduce the heat to low and simmer very gently for about two hours until volume is reduced by half.  The mixture should be barely simmering and never bubbling at any time to get a smooth outcome. 
3/  Stir every 15 minutes to keep the milk from forming a "skin" on top. 
4/  Stir in butter at 2 hours mark, and once butter has melted, remove the Home-made Sweetened Condensed Milk from heat and let it cool.  Mixture will thicken further after it has cooled. 
 
Here is the summary of previous attempts: 
 

Friday, October 4, 2013

Hokkaido Milk Bread Loaf with Tang Zhong

Curious as to how both Christine's and Angie's recipe differ in terms of outcome for the Hokkaido Milk Bread Loaf, and rather than to keep on wondering, pondering to no end, I put in the action to settle the question mark once and for all.  Also, since I still have so much of the whipping cream left to utilise, this more than kills 2 birds with one recipe. 

The Tang Zhong was very fast to make, and while waiting for it to cool down, I got the rest of the ingredients ready.  Only pause that kept me from moving forward was the amount of Tang Zhong to use.  Situation was such that I the portion of Tang Zhong I made (25g bread flour with 125ml water resulted in 140g of Tang Zhong) was more than that called for the recipe (recipe only needs 92g), so what to do with the excess?  Not wanting to waste it by dumping, but at the same time, I was not sure how else to use it apart from searching for another recipe, I went ahead to use up all 140g of Tang Zhong.  Glad that the dough still turned out well, in fact, my attempt on this recipe gave me an even fluffier loaf despite the dough weight being less (Christine's recipe yield dough of 540g, whereas Angie's was 600g).  Finishing up the Tang Zhong might also have cause the dough to be wetter than the other recipe's, but still manageable without any greasing nor flouring. 

The method I used for this recipe was the same as my previous posting, only difference was that I shaped the dough into 3 portions this time.  I like this outcome better, compared to 4 portions. 

Between the 2 recipes, this gave me an even softer bread.  I suspect my first attempt was not very successful as when I compared a slice of bread each from the 2 different rolls, this bread roll was taller.  So verdict ~~~  YES to Tang Zhong. 

Tang Zhong ready to spring to action! 














HOKKAIDO MILK BREAD LOAF WITH TANG ZHONG
Source:  Christine's recipe as shared by Zoe
Yield:  20.5cm x 10.5cm weighing 540g
Ingredients:
For Tang Zhong
25g Bread flour
125ml water

For Bread Dough
270g Bread flour
5g Dry active yeast (1 tsp)
5g Milk powder (1.5 tsp) 
40g Sugar
4g Salt (1/8 tsp fine salt)
1/2 Egg (beaten, and I measured 2 tbsp)
30ml Fresh milk (2tbsp) *I used Dutch Lady's UHT low fat milk*
30ml Whipping cream (heavy cream) (2 tbsp.) *I used Emborg brand*
25g Butter (softened)
 
Method: 
1/  Mix flour in water (or milk) well without any lumps, then cook this over medium-low heat, stirring consistently with a wooden spoon, whisk or spatula to prevent burning and sticking while you oook along the way.  As the mixture becomes thicker and thicker, once some “lines” start to appear in the mixture for every stir you make with the spoon, the Tang Zhong is ready now to be used once it has cooled down. 
2/  Place the dry ingredients in the bowl, then create a well in the centre and pour in all the combined liquids plus Tang Zhong and mix till a dough is formed. 
3/  Then add in the softened butter and knead till gluten is fully developed and the dough gets elastically smooth and non-sticky.  Cover with a damp towel and allow dough to rise until double in volume, about 60 minutes.  *I took 45 minutes*
4/  Take out the dough and punch out the gas produced during the proofing, then divide dough into 3 portions.  Round up and let it rest for about 20 minutes. 
5/  Roll out each portion of the dough with a rolling pin into an oval shape, fold 1/3 from top edge to the middle and press. Then fold 1/3 from bottom to the middle and press. 
6/  Turn seal downward, roll flat and stretch dough to about 30cm in length.  With seal upward, roll
into a cylinder.  With seal facing down, place in the loaf tins to have the 2nd round of proofing, until double in size.
7/  Egg wash surface of bread, bake in a pre-heated 180°C (or 160°C fan forced) oven for 30 to 35 minutes until turns brown.  *I baked mine for 40 minutes. 
8/  Remove bread from the oven and transfer onto a wire rack to cool down before slicing. 

"Bottoms" Up! 

Comparison in terms of height yield from both recipes, the one in front is Angie's recipe. 

 
I am submitting this post to 'Bake Along #52" hosted by Lena, Joyce & Zoe.  

Hokkaido Milk Bread Loaf

 
A recipe that I had bookmarked for quite sometime now when it was in "fashion" way back, and it has been left hibernating in the folder ever since.  With the Bake Along event #52, it was a good nudge for me to check this item -
Hokkaido Milk Bread Loaf
off my forever-growing list of recipes to try {what's new?!?}
 
Glad I attempted this recipe.  I was undecided which to go for, with or without Tang Zhong.  Yay or nay, yay or nay, in the end, I opted for the latter simply because I can skip a step *wink*, which was making the Tang Zhong.  Thus the recipe I made was by Angie.  I halved her recipe for one loaf of 20.5cm x 10.5cm. 
After tasting the soft yummy bread, I think I would want to give the one with Tang Zhong a chance next.  I love how cottony soft the bread yields, and it was very fragrant too.  The dough was also very manageable, I didn't even need to grease my hands when shaping the bread nor do I need to flour the board. 
 
I love how Zoe of Bake for Happy Kids did a comparison between the two recipes, and that provided me a quick glance at both ingredients lists one shot.  So I kind of did a bit of mix-and-match from both recipes, in the sense that I tried Angie's recipe, but used Christine's method in shaping the dough.  Therefore, it can be said that I had the best of both worlds?!? 
 

Don't know why the dough on the left most was kind of squashed and looked thinner compared to the rest, although I weighed and divided the dough equally of 140g. 


The delicately soft texture that was so extremely inviting, so much so that I can't wait to give it a bite!  I sliced it and chomped down a piece the soonest the Hokkaido Milk Bread Loaf cool down to a manageable temperature. 
 
 
 

Before and after baking, oh la la....just look at the shine!! 


HOKKAIDO MILK BREAD LOAF
Source:  Angie's recipe as shared by Zoe
Yield:  20.5cm x 10.5cm weighing 600g
Ingredients:
270 g Bread flour
30g Cake flour *I used plain flour*
5g Dry active yeast (1 tsp)
15g Milk powder (1.5 tbsp) 
40g Sugar
4g Salt (1/8 tsp fine salt)
1/2 Egg (beaten, and I measured 2 tbsp)
125g Fresh milk *I used Dutch Lady's UHT low fat milk*
75g Whipping cream (heavy cream) *I used Emborg brand*

Method: 
1/  Heat up fresh milk till it bubbles lightly on the sides, then add the sugar and give it a stir before scattering the yeast on top of the milk and wait till it gets frothy.  (I did this to be sure the yeast I was using was still alive). 
2/  Place the rest of the dry ingredients in the bowl, then create a well in the centre and pour in all the combined liquids and mix till a dough is formed. 
3/  Knead till gluten is fully developed and the dough gets elastically smooth and non-sticky.  Cover with a damp towel and allow dough to rise until double in volume, about 60 minutes.  *I took 45 minutes*
4/  Take out the dough and punch out the gas produced during the proofing, then divide dough into 4 portions.  Round up and let it rest for about 20 minutes. 
*The steps in shaping dough was adapted from Christine's* 
5/  Roll out each portion of the dough with a rolling pin into an oval shape, fold 1/3 from top edge to the middle and press. Then fold 1/3 from bottom to the middle and press. 
6/  Turn seal downward, roll flat and stretch dough to about 30cm in length.  With seal upward, roll into a cylinder.  With seal facing down, place in the loaf tins to have the 2nd round of proofing, until double in size.
7/  Egg wash surface of bread, bake in a pre-heated 180°C (or 160°C fan forced) oven for 30 to 35 minutes until turns brown.  *I baked mine for 30 minutes. 
8/  Remove bread from the oven and transfer onto a wire rack to cool down before slicing. 



 
I am submitting this post to 'Bake Along #52" hosted by Lena, Joyce & Zoe.